Invoking a jQuery function after .each() has completed

It's probably to late but i think this code work...

$blocks.each(function(i, elm) {
 $(elm).fadeOut(200, function() {
  $(elm).remove();
 });
}).promise().done( function(){ alert("All was done"); } );

An alternative to @tv's answer:

var elems = $(parentSelect).nextAll(), count = elems.length;

elems.each( function(i) {
  $(this).fadeOut(200, function() { 
    $(this).remove(); 
    if (!--count) doMyThing();
  });
});

Note that .each() itself is synchronous — the statement that follows the call to .each() will be executed only after the .each() call is complete. However, asynchronous operations started in the .each() iteration will of course continue on in their own way. That's the issue here: the calls to fade the elements are timer-driven animations, and those continue at their own pace.

The solution above, therefore, keeps track of how many elements are being faded. Each call to .fadeOut() gets a completion callback. When the callback notices that it's counted through all of the original elements involved, some subsequent action can be taken with confidence that all of the fading has finished.

This is a four-year-old answer (at this point in 2014). A modern way to do this would probably involve using the Deferred/Promise mechanism, though the above is simple and should work just fine.


Ok, this might be a little after the fact, but .promise() should also achieve what you're after.

Promise documentation

An example from a project i'm working on:

$( '.panel' )
    .fadeOut( 'slow')
    .promise()
    .done( function() {
        $( '#' + target_panel ).fadeIn( 'slow', function() {});
    });

:)

Tags:

Jquery

Each