Auto accept rsa key fingerprint from command line

Solution 1:

OpenSSH 7.6 has introduced new StrictHostKeyChecking=accept-new setting for exactly this purpose:

ssh(1): expand the StrictHostKeyChecking option with two new
   settings. The first "accept-new" will automatically accept
   hitherto-unseen keys but will refuse connections for changed or
   invalid hostkeys. This is a safer subset of the current behaviour
   of StrictHostKeyChecking=no. The second setting "n", is a synonym
   for the current behaviour of StrictHostKeyChecking=no: accept new
   host keys, and continue connection for hosts with incorrect
   hostkeys. A future release will change the meaning of
   StrictHostKeyChecking=no to the behaviour of "accept-new".

(OpenSSH 7.6 Release notes)

Solution 2:

Using SSH Programmatically with known hosts key

If what you want is to be able to use programmatically AND avoid Man-In-The-Middle attack, then I suggest you get the known fingerprint using the command ssh-keyscan. Example:

$ ssh-keyscan -t rsa,dsa github.com 2>/dev/null
github.com ssh-dss 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
github.com ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1yc2EAAAABIwAAAQEAq2A7hRGmdnm9tUDbO9IDSwBK6TbQa+PXYPCPy6rbTrTtw7PHkccKrpp0yVhp5HdEIcKr6pLlVDBfOLX9QUsyCOV0wzfjIJNlGEYsdlLJizHhbn2mUjvSAHQqZETYP81eFzLQNnPHt4EVVUh7VfDESU84KezmD5QlWpXLmvU31/yMf+Se8xhHTvKSCZIFImWwoG6mbUoWf9nzpIoaSjB+weqqUUmpaaasXVal72J+UX2B+2RPW3RcT0eOzQgqlJL3RKrTJvdsjE3JEAvGq3lGHSZXy28G3skua2SmVi/w4yCE6gbODqnTWlg7+wC604ydGXA8VJiS5ap43JXiUFFAaQ==

Then you can forge a script to save it to a temporary file and use the UserKnownHostsFile option. The example below is a script, which can be called ssh_github:

#!/bin/bash

HOSTKEY='github.com ssh-dss AAAAB3NzaC1kc3MAAACBANGFW2P9xlGU3zWrymJgI/lKo//ZW2WfVtmbsUZJ5uyKArtlQOT2+WRhcg4979aFxgKdcsqAYW3/LS1T2km3jYW/vr4Uzn+dXWODVk5VlUiZ1HFOHf6s6ITcZvjvdbp6ZbpM+DuJT7Bw+                      h5Fx8Qt8I16oCZYmAPJRtu46o9C2zk1AAAAFQC4gdFGcSbp5Gr0Wd5Ay/jtcldMewAAAIATTgn4sY4Nem/FQE+XJlyUQptPWMem5fwOcWtSXiTKaaN0lkk2p2snz+EJvAGXGq9dTSWHyLJSM2W6ZdQDqWJ1k+cL8CARAqL+UMwF84CR0m3hj+wtVGD/J4G5kW2DBAf4/bqzP4469lT+dF2FRQ2L9JKXrCWcnhMtJUvua8dvnwAAAIB6C4nQfAA7x8oLta6tT+oCk2WQcydNsyugE8vLrHlogoWEicla6cWPk7oXSspbzUcfkjN3Qa6e74PhRkc7JdSdAlFzU3m7LMkXo1MHgkqNX8glxWNVqBSc0YRdbFdTkL0C6gtpklilhvuHQCdbgB3LBAikcRkDp+FCVkUgPC/7Rw==
github.com ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1yc2EAAAABIwAAAQEAq2A7hRGmdnm9tUDbO9IDSwBK6TbQa+                                                                                                                                      PXYPCPy6rbTrTtw7PHkccKrpp0yVhp5HdEIcKr6pLlVDBfOLX9QUsyCOV0wzfjIJNlGEYsdlLJizHhbn2mUjvSAHQqZETYP81eFzLQNnPHt4EVVUh7VfDESU84KezmD5QlWpXLmvU31/yMf+Se8xhHTvKSCZIFImWwoG6mbUoWf9nzpIoaSjB+weqqUUmpaaasXVal72J+UX2B+    2RPW3RcT0eOzQgqlJL3RKrTJvdsjE3JEAvGq3lGHSZXy28G3skua2SmVi/w4yCE6gbODqnTWlg7+wC604ydGXA8VJiS5ap43JXiUFFAaQ=='

TEMPFILE=$(mktemp)
echo "$HOSTKEY" > $TEMPFILE

ssh -o "UserKnownHostsFile $TEMPFILE" [email protected]

rm $TEMPFILE

With this, you can just run ssh_github instead of ssh and it will connect even if there is no known_hosts file where you put the script.


Solution 3:

Add these to your bash startup file, or similar:

 #
 #  ssh + scp without storing or prompting for keys.
 #
 function sshtmp
 {
     ssh -o "ConnectTimeout 3" \
         -o "StrictHostKeyChecking no" \
         -o "UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null" \
              "[email protected]"
 }
 function scptmp
 {
     exec scp -o "ConnectTimeout 3" \
         -o "StrictHostKeyChecking no" \
         -o "UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null" \
         "[email protected]"
 }

Then use sshtmp, or scptmp in place of ssh and scp.

NOTE If you do go down this road you'll not be alerted that a host-key has changed and will lose security.